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There is no doubt that there has been a significant reduction in the number of people defecating in the open in the last five years between 2015 and 2020. But despite this, about 494 million people around the world still defecate in the open, which includes about 15 percent of India's population. If seen, in 55 countries of the world, more than 5 percent of the population still defecates in the open. Where the situation is worst in sub-Saharan Africa. However, between 2015 and 2020, the number of people who defecate in the open has declined by about 24.5 crore. Which has been made possible to a large extent due to Central and South Asia. While the number of people defecating in the open has come down by 196 crore in the last five years, India also has a large population of this. Not only this, where in East and South East Asia its number has decreased by 24 million, in South America and Caribbean this decrease has been recorded by about 10 million. If seen, most regions of the world are on track to completely eliminate the practice of open defecation by 2030. Sub-Saharan Africa is progressing very slowly in this regard, while Oceania has registered an increase in the rate of open defecation. This information has recently come out in the report titled 'Progress on Household Drinking Water, Sanitation and Hygiene 2000-2020' jointly released by WHO and UNICEF . South Sudan, Chad and Niger are the countries in Africa where more than 60 percent of the population still defecate in the open. On the other hand, there are countries like South Africa, Gambia, Mayotte, Réunion, Santo Helena, Seychelles where less than one percent of the population defecates in the open. There has also been a decrease of 14 percent in India in the last 5 years : If we look at the data related to India, where in 2015 about 29 population of the country used to go for open defecation, it has come down to 15 percent in 2020. Which clearly tells the success story of Swachh Bharat Mission. In this context, India is progressing in this direction at the rate of about 2.96 per cent every year. On the other hand, if we talk about rural India, in 2015 about 40 percent of the rural population of the country used to defecate in the open, but in 2020 this figure has come down to 22 percent. Similarly, in urban India, where 7 percent of the population used to defecate in the open during 2015, it has come down to less than one percent in 2020. If seen, India has the biggest contribution in the progress made in this direction between 2015 and 2020 across the world. Where it has declined by 14 percent in the last five years. In Cambodia, the number of people who defecate in the open has declined by about 16 per cent in the last five years. At the same time, the African country Ethiopia has also surprised everyone where it has decreased by 15 percent and in Nepal by 14 percent. If progress in this direction continues at this pace, then most regions of the world will be free from the practice of open defecation by 2030. However, this growth is slow in sub-Saharan Africa, while it is increasing in Oceania. Papua New Guinea is the country in Oceania where the practice of open defecation is most prevalent. There, about 1.4 million people or 16 percent of the population defecate in the open. At the same time, 30 percent of the population in Kiribati and about 45 percent of the Solomon Islands do this. In such a situation, the least developed countries of the world need to try twice as fast to achieve the goal of eliminating defecation by 2030.